Propriétaire - Eleveur

Our white wines

Bourgogne Aligoté

Characteristics :

Bourgogne aligoté is a delicious white wine that is young, stylish and is a little different. It is pale gold in color and offers a well-balanced taste, and ranges from a fruity bouquet with notes of apple and lemon to a more floral palette. In the mouth, this vibrant wine tickles the taste buds.

 

Wine Steward's Tip :

Although Bourgogne aligoté is traditionally associated with drinking Kir, the local Bourgogne specialty of white wine mixed with crème de cassis blackcurrant liqueur, it has its own qualities and deserves to be enjoyed in its own right. It is a perfect match for grilled fish, and its liveliness and citrus notes stand up well to the saltiness of oysters and strong goat cheese.
Bourgogne aligoté is one of the rare wines that does not overpower salads, tabouleh or steamed vegetables. It is also a worthy companion to traditional local creations such as gougères pastries, snails with garlic butter and jambon persillé, a terrine of cold ham in parsley aspic.
Serving temperature: 11 to 12°C.

 

Situation : 

The Aligoté grape has been grown in Bourgogne since the 17th century and flourishes here. Whether from the Saône-et-Loire, the Côte-d’Or or the Yonne, it faithfully reflects the diversity of its terroirs. It was granted its own AOC, Bourgogne aligoté, in 1937.

 

Terroirs : 

Although it is planted in very different winegrowing areas, the Aligoté grape is generally found on limestone soils, often combined with marl or clay. Aligoté is also suited to hilly locations and higher altitude

Characteristics : 

white-gold to pale gold in colour, or, if aged in barrel, yellow gold. Notes of hawthorn and honeysuckle mingle with apple, lemon, white deadnettle and hazelnut. In the mouth, they are fleshy, solidly built, well-balanced, and with an easily-recognisable touch of friskiness which improves their aging potential.

 

Wine Steward's Tip :

Its sprightly and harmonious personality is meant for the spread made from carp roe (tarama), steamed fish, and crustaceans. Its vivacious nature equips it to accompany the Burgundian specialties of ham with parsley (jambon persillé) and snails (escargots). Fully mature, the wine goes very with the delicacy foie gras au sel. Cheeses: Roquefort, Aisy cendré, mature Comté, Chaource.
Serving temperature: 10 to 13°C.

 

Situation : 

At one time apparently doomed to disappear these vineyards have undergone a patient, courageous, and ultimately successful restoration. Overlooking the slopes of Gevrey-Chambertin and extending as far as the wood of Corton, the Hautes Côtes de Nuits have a wild beauty. Little villages nested in the forest fringes lay waiting to be discovered. The vineyards cover all these slopes which enjoy favourable exposures and proudly preserve their proof of nobility going back to Vergy and the abbey of Saint-Vivant. The wines will reveal their secrets to discerning palates in the company of vignerons who, like the countryside they inhabit, are full of character and profoundly attached to their native soil. The roads which take you there are winding and undulating, a delight for cyclists.Ramblers may follow the paths among hills and valleys which lead to holiday cottages or overnight accommodation in the heart of the villages. And there, too, you will certainly find the door to the tasting cellar open.

 

Terroirs : 

The vineyards are located at heights of between 300 and 400 metres and occupy the sides of valleys which cut into the Jurassic limestone plateau to the west of the Côte.The underlying rock is the same as that of the Côte but the overburden is thin or non-existent. The soils are formed by a mixture of eroded limestone and marly subsoil.

 

Bourgogne Hautes-Côtes de Nuits

Characteristics:

this wine is sometimes gold with emerald highlights, sometimes pale straw colour. Its nose is flowery and light-hearted. Its bouquet frequently evokes butter and brioche with notes of lemon, grapefruit, and occassionally a touch of minerality. A lively attack helps to make this a clean, straightforward wine - quite fleshy, persistent, and occasionally with a touch of spice.

 

Wine Steward's Tip :

its lively and straightforward attack would suit fresh-water fish in white sauce, omelettes, or scrambled eggs, while its rich and unctuous bouquet would deliver an attractive and restful finish. It proves a worthy companion to goat cheeses, Gruyère, Comté, and Cîteaux.
Serving temperature: 11 to 12°C.

 

Situation : 

Between the Hill of Corton and Beaune, the landscape opens up like a map unfolding. The hills of the Côte de Beaune recede a little on either side of the little river Rhoin. These vineyards are of ancient lineage. For much of their history, they belonged to the domaine of the Dukes of Bourgogne, to neighbouring religious houses, or to the Knights of Malta. An imposing 14th century castle testifies to the appellation’s aristocratic qualifications. The
AOC status dates from 1937.

 

Terroirs

The gradient is gentle at first but stiffer as one goes higher. Altitude varies from 250 to 400 metres. The lower slopes consist of alluvia from the Rhoin.
Higher, the geology is that of the Hill of Corton. At the Pernand-Vergelesses end, exposure is southerly and the soils are gravelly with a scattering of oolitic ironstone. Lower down, the red-brown limestone becomes more clayey and pebbly. Opposite, the slope faces East and the limestone soils include some sand

Savigny-les-Beaune "Les Vermots"

Our red wines

Characteristics : 

Reds and rosés are produced from Pinot Noir, Gamay Noir à jus blanc, and the César varietal.
The diversity of soils and subsoils and grape varieties gives this appellation a wide range of wines that are fruity and tempting. They also provide an opportunity for the curious to discover lesser-known grape varieties.

 

Wine Steward's Tip :

this tender and fruity wine goes well with dishes with moderate aromatic intensity, or with delicate white meats. It is a worthy partner for poultry and rabbit, as well as pasta or rice with tomato sauce or steamed vegetables. The delicacy of its tannins means it can be enjoyed with fish for those who prefer red wines over anything.
Serving temperature: 12 to 14°C.

 

Situation : 

This appellation Coteaux Bourguignons created in 2011 covers red, white, and rosé wines, grown over four départements. The Coteaux Bourguignons appellation covers wines that can be blended or come from a single varietal, and which can use some more old-fashioned varietals. The word rosé can be replaced by the word Clairet.

 

Terroirs : 

This wine is grown on an infinite variety of soils from the chalky soils around Joigny, in the North, to the granites of southern Bourgogne, not forgetting the limestone-rich and marly soils that are home to the majority of this appellation

Côteaux Bourguignons

Bourgogne Hautes-Côtes de Nuits

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Savigny-les-Beaune "Les Petits Picotins"

Caractères :

robe cerise profonde, pourpre à reflets grenat, puis un bouquet porté sur les petits fruits noirs et rouges (cassis, cerise, framboise), ainsi que sur les fleurs (violette). Le corps est discrètement tannique, étoffé. Il préserve son fruit. Rondeur et volume, l’équilibre et la puissance en de justes proportions évoquent souvent les griottes avec une belle élégance.

 

Accords Mets et Vins : 

Son volume et sa puissance tout en rondeur accompagneront de plaisantes et goûteuses pièces de bœuf, voire un foie gras poêlé. Sur une volaille rôtie bien croustillante, sa personnalité charnue pourra jouer avec les fibres un peu sèches d’une volaille, ainsi qu’avec celles, plus aromatiques, d’une volaille laquée ou caramélisée. Pour les fromages, il préfère ceux à saveur douce du type chaource, brie de Meaux, tomme, reblochon, cantal, mont d’or, époisses.
Température de service : 15 °C.

 

Situation

Comme une carte qui se déplie, le paysage s’élargit entre la Montagne de Corton et Beaune. Les hauteurs de la Côte de Beaune prennent un peu de recul, de part et d’autre d’une petite rivière le Rhoin. Le vignoble est ancien. Il a longtemps appartenu au domaine Ducal, aux abbayes voisines, aux chevaliers de Malte. L’important château du XIVème siècle signale les prétentions légitimes du cru.

 

Terroirs : 

Sur des coteaux s’élevant en pente douce puis plus ferme, de 250 mètres à 400 mètres d’altitude, on trouve le cône alluvial du Rhoin et ensuite la géologie de la Montagne de Corton. Côté Pernand-Vergelesses, l’exposition plein sud bénéficie de sols graveleux, parsemés d’oolithe ferrugineux. En descendant, le calcaire brun-rouge devient plus argileux, caillouteux. En face, le coteau regarde le levant sur des terrains calcaires à nuances sableuses.

Savigny-les-Beaune 1er Cru "Aux Serpentières"

Characteristics :

Beware of preconceived notions! The fame of Pommard in the 19th century earned it the image of a wine that is both forceful and virile. In reality, time, terroir and methods of vinification have all combined to create a more subtle reality, a wine that is both richer and more sensitive. Its colour is the deep, dark red with mauve highlights which caused Victor Hugo to speak of it as “night in combat with day”. Its aromas are redolent of blackberry, bilberry, or gooseberry, cherry pit and ripe plum. Often, wild and feline notes develop with age. At full maturity, it tends towards leather, chocolate and pepper. It needs to be given time to open up to its fullest extent and to display its mouth-filling texture, its firm but delicate structure, its fruit-filled mouth, and its chewy tannins, which by then will be properly smoothed down. A “rich” wine ? Certainly.

 

Wine Steward's Tip :

This illustrious representative of the Côte de Beaune with its dense and massive tannins revels in furred or feathered game, braised or roasted, which will find in Pommard (and especially in the Premiers Crus) an invaluable collaborator. Thick cut beefsteak, lamb, or stewed poultry will respond to its firm-textured tannins and concentrated aromas. It is a natural partner for cheeses with well-developed flavours: Époisses, Langres and Soumaintrain, but also Comté.
Serving temperature: 14 to 16°C.

 

Situation

For centuries Pommard has been considered the typical Bourgogne: deep red in colour, powerfully aromatic, solid and trustworthy. The very name Pommard has a generous ring to it and fills the mouth as it fills the glass. Pommard with its smiling vineyards lies between Beaune and Volnay where the Côte de
Beaune makes a slight turn towards Autun. These lands formerly belonged to the Dukes of Bourgogne, to religious houses including the abbey of Cîteaux, or to old families such as the Marey-Monge family. As early as the Middle Ages, Pommard was thought of as the flower of Bourgogne wines - the wine to which all others were compared. The appellation, one of the first AOC to be so designated (1936), grows only red wines from the Pinot Noir grape.

 

Terroirs : 

On the lower ground the soil is ancient alluvium. Mid-slope, the clay-limestone soils are well drained thanks to the inclusion of rock debris. Higher still are Jurassic (Oxfordian) marls, brown calcic soils, and brown limestone soils. In places, the soil is reddened by the presence of iron. Exposure: south or east.
Altitudes: 250 to 330 metres.

Pommard

Nuits-Saint-Georges "Aux Saints Juliens"

Nuits-Saint-Georges 1er Cru "Aux Bousselots"

Characteristics : 

The appellation falls into two parts, divided by the town itself. The northern portion extends as far as the border of Vosne-Romanée, and the southern section lies partly in Nuits-Saint-Georges and partly in Premeaux.
Corresponding differences are observed in the wines. Their colour is an intense crepuscular crimson with a hint of mauve. The nose often features rose and liquorice. The young red wine has aromas of cherry, strawberry and blackcurrant, and when matured, leather, truffle, fur, game. Notes of macerated fruits (prune) complete the picture. Muscular and vigorous, chewy and full-bodied, its structure is both well built and well-balanced and it is long in the mouth. It is most fully enjoyed after several years’ laying down which rounds it out and underlines its sensuality and breeding.

 

Terroirs : 

The soils in the northern sector derive from pebbly alluvium washed down from up-slope, or, in the low-lying parts, silty deposits from the river Meuzin. In the southern sector the alluvia at the base of the slope originate in the combe of Vallerots where there are deep marly-limestone soils, while at the top of the slope, the rock is almost at the surface. Exposures are mostly to the East or South-East.

 

Wine Steward's Tip :

powerful and strongly-built, this is the wine that confers on the Côte de Nuits its noble reputation of a sturdy character. Its normal partners would be any meat that is at once full-flavoured and virile (roast lamb, rib steak, or breast of fattened duck), as the wine firmly coats and envelops its fibrous texture. Feathered game, similarly, responds to the charm of the wild and animal aromas which the wine develops with age. Sophisticated diners will also serve it with certain fish dishes such as carp in red-wine sauce. Cheeses: soft centred cheeses in the style of Époisses, Langres or Soumaintrain.
Serving temperature: 15 to 16°C.

 

Situation : 

Nuits-Saint-Georges is a likeable and lively town with a centuries-old history of winemaking. It gives its name to the Côte de Nuits, and its patron saint, Saint Georges, gives his name to their most famous wine. Its AOC, which dates from September 1936, includes the commune of Premeaux-Prissey in the appellation. Most of the wines grown here are Pinot Noir, but there are some plots planted with Chardonnay. The Confrérie des Chevaliers du Tastevin, Bourgogne’s most famous wine-brotherhood, was founded here in 1934.

 

Terroirs : 

The soils in the northern sector derive from pebbly alluvium washed down from up-slope, or, in the low-lying parts, silty deposits from the river Meuzin. In the southern sector the alluvia at the base of the slope originate in the combe of Vallerots where there are deep marly-limestone soils, while at the top of the slope, the rock is almost at the surface. Exposures are mostly to the East or South-East.

Nuits-Saint-Georges 1er Cru "Les Cailles"

Characteristics :

Shades of red vary from pure ruby to black tulip and are often quite intense.
At other times the wine is a fiery red darkening to garnet with a touch of crimson. Ripe fruit over spices is frequently the main ingredient of the bouquet, modified by the presence of strawberry, raspberry, bilberry, or blackcurrant. These refined and well-blended aromas evolve with age into cherries-in-brandy, preserved fruits, leather and fur, and gamey/woodland scents. On the palate the wine is velvety and distinguished - the Pinot Noir at the top of its form. The wine may seem a little austere in its youth; it needs time in the bottle to develop structure and fleshy texture. Often full-bodied and voluptuous, this wine is the equivalent of a Rubens nude.

 

Wine Steward's Tip :

The powerfully tannic but nevertheless perfectly smooth build of this spicy, opulent, and meaty wine inclines it towards strongly-flavoured meats with a markedly fibrous consistency which the wine can tame and envelop. Goodquality poultry, lamb (patiently oven-roasted), and roast feathered game are easy first choices. But a thick cut of lean, firm-textured beef will match the wine’s fullness, while spicy couscous with poultry will be equally delighted with such a wine for company. A less obvious pairing - foie gras poêlé – also has its advocates amongst serious foodies. This wine has a sufficient force of personality to accompany intensely-flavoured cheeses such as Époisses,
Langres, Saint-Florentin, or Aisy cendré, as well as Cîteaux.
Serving temperature: 14 to 16°C.

 

Situation

“Bourgogne has produced nothing better than this little corner where all her charms come together”. So wrote Gaston Roupnel Burgundian author, celebrated historian of the French countryside. This “central pearl in Bourgogne’s necklace” harbours fabled Grands Crus: ROMANÉE-CONTI, ROMANÉE SAINTVIVANT, LA ROMANÉE, LA TÂCHE, LA GRANDE RUE, RICHEBOURG, and, in the neighbouring commune of FLAGEY-ÉCHEZEAUX, ÉCHEZEAUX and
GRANDS ÉCHEZEAUX. Close to this paradise, the appellation Village VOSNEROMANÉE and its Premiers Crus express the Pinot Noir grape at its heavenly best.

 

Terroirs

The plots growing the communal appellation lie either at the top of the slope or at its foot on either side of the Grand Cru Climats and in some cases reaching the same altitude. The soils are limestone mixed with clayey marls. Depth of soil varies from some tens of centimetres to 1 metre deep. The exposure is easterly.

Vosne-Romanée

Characteristics :

Chambolle-Musigny is a red wine, often regarded as the most “feminine” wine of the Côte de Nuits; its intensity and delicacy express themselves with elegance and subtlety. To the eye, it presents a bright ruby hue with luminous highlights. It may darken a little over time but with no loss of impact. Its bouquet, easily recognisable, is composed of violet and small red fruits (raspberry, strawberry). With further aging it tends towards spiced ripe fruits and prune, or towards truffle, underbrush and animal notes. Rich, fragrant and complex, it lines the palate with silk and lace. Its delicate but fleshy texture in no way detracts from its solid and durable structure. On the sweet side with little trace of acidity, its tannins remain silky-smooth.
 

Wine Steward's Tip :

With a personality that allies power and feminity, it demands high-flavoured and sophisticated dishes like feathered game (in sauce, for example), well-roasted lamb or a free range capon. Roast veal’s subtle texture would be delicately enveloped by the dense but silky tannins of the Chambolle (especially the Premiers Crus). Cheeses - preferably mild: Brillat-Savarin, Reblochon, Cîteaux, Vacherin, Brie de Meaux or Chaource. Soft-centred cheeses will respond to its great aromatic complexity.
Serving temperatures: 12 to 14°C for young wines,14 to 16°C for older wines.

 

Situation : 

This little village of the Côte de Nuits, formerly an adjunct of the Abbey of Cîteaux, is unwilling to expand, since to do so would mean encroaching on its precious land (though it has given space to a lime-tree with a girth of 5 metres!).
Two superb appellations Grands Crus are grown here: BONNES-MARES, which links its vineyards to those of Morey-Saint-Denis, and MUSIGNY which overlooks the Clos de Vougeot. The village also boasts among its fine wines a prestigious Premier Cru, Les Amoureuses. Its AOC dates from September 1936, making it one of the first French vineyards to be thus designated.

 

Terroirs : 

The slope faces east at altitudes of 250-300 metres with only a shallow covering of soil overlying the parent rock, but fissures in the hard Jurassic limestone allow the roots to seek nourishment deep within the sub-soil. Boulders and gravels in the valley bottom ensure good drainage.

Chambolle-Musigny 1er Cru

Characteristics : 

The extensive area covered by this appellation Grand Cru and the large number of different Climats it contains explain the observable differences in character among the wines grown here. The rare whites (grown mainly in the Climats of Vergennes and Languettes) have a keeping potential of 4-10 years. Colour: pale gold with green highlights. Mineral aromas (flint) blend with butter, baked apple, bracken, cinnamon and honey. Elegant and highly-bred, supple and well rounded, this unusual Chardonnay has much in common with Corton-Charlemagne. The Corton reds are an intense velvety crimson, darkening towards magenta. Their generous aromatic expression is of fruit notes (blueberry, gooseberry, kirsch cherry) or flowers (violet), evolving towards underbrush, animal, leather, fur, pepper and liquorice. On the palate this wine is well-built, powerful and muscular and the chewy body comes to the fore. Firm, frank and fat, it requires time (4-12 years) to reach its peak.

 

Wine Steward's Tip :

solid and opulent, Corton is a Bourgogne’s iconic - highly complex, impressively mouth-filling in a way that is at once sensual and structured.
For this reason, strong soft-centred cheeses and blue cheeses are needed to tame it. But, without question, its closest companions are highlyflavoured meats that match its powerful flavours and intense aromas.
Indeed this wine is sublime with roast or grilled beef, or any and all game (furred or feathered) roasted, braised or - naturally - in sauce.
Serving temperature: 14 to 16°C.

 

Situation : 

The Hill of Corton lies in the midst of a cluster of famous wine-growing villages - Ladoix-Serrigny, Aloxe-Corton, Pernand-Vergelesses and Savigny-lès-Beaune - with, to the North, the southern end of the Côte de Nuits where vineyards mingle with stone quarries (Comblanchien limestone). The vineyards lie at heights of 250-330 metres and form a kind of amphitheatre not found elsewhere in the Côte. The Hill of Corton produces white Corton-Charlemagne and (mainly) red Corton, described by Camille Rodier as “le roi des bons-vivants” (or “the king of the bon vivants”). Corton Grand Cru received its AOC status on 31 July, 1937. A small quantity of white wine is grown but only the reds have the right to add the name of their Climat to that of the appellation.

 

Terroirs : 

Exposure is South-East/South-West (not an arrangement frequently found in the Côte). The hillside offers a text-book cut-away illustration of the local geology. The Oxfordian Jurassic limestone lying between Ladoix and Meursault is younger (145 million years) here than elsewhere along the Côte. At mid-slope the gradient is gentle and the soil reddish and pebbly, derived from brown limestone and rich deposits of marl with high potassium content. The Pinot Noir grape is pampered here. The Chardonnay grape (which gives us the Corton- Charlemagne) occupies the top of the slope (See Appellation sheets No. 31).

Corton Grand Cru "Les Renardes"

Nos Vins Effervescents

Characteristics

A wine bursting with youth and audacity. Its freshness and vigour are a matter of general agreement. Given time, it acquires the stateliness of a great wine. The brut faithfully reflects its lively and clear-cut personality. As demise or sec, vivacity yields to smoothness and makes room for a new taste impression, that of sweetness.
 

Wine Steward's Tip :

Although Crémant de Bourgogne is a perfect pre-dinner drink, this in no way takes away from the fact that it is also a perfect accompaniment to food. The blanc chimes with main dishes such as stewed poultry with pears and dried fruits (confit de volaille aux poires et fruits secs).With the blanc de blancs, try scallops or river fish. The blanc de noirs makes a splendid match for braised oxtail or snails with potatoes (escargots en coque de pomme de terre) and is the ideal partner for poultry such as a fattened hen from La Bresse. The rosé is a sound choice as a dessert wine with its powerful floral aromas which go perfectly with ice cream and bring a touch of freshness to the close of a meal. It is ideal with pastries and its fruit scents are unbeatable with a red-fruit sorbet.
Serving temperatures: 4 to 8°C as a pre-dinner drink or dessert wine,6 to 9°C with main meal.

 

Situation : 

Sparkling Bourgogne made its entrance into history in 1830 when it was lauded by the poet Alfred de Musset (1820-1857) in his “Secrètes pensées de Raphaël”. It was first made at the beginning of the 19th century at Chablis, Nuits-Saint-Georges, Rully and Tonnerre, and since then has not ceased to sparkle. It was for a long time the practice to make effervescent versions of prestigious Burgundian Grands Crus but the AOC status granted in 1975 laid down strict conditions for its production on the basis of meticulously-applied traditional skills to achieve high-quality vinification. Only whites and rosés qualify for the appellation. They may be blanc de blancs (from white grapes) or blanc de noirs (from white-juiced black grapes). Most are classed as brut or, less often, demi-sec. The production area is the same as that for the appellation Bourgogne.

 

Terroirs : 

The grapes from which the vins de base for Crémant de Bourgogne are made come from a wide variety of soils in vineyard districts throughout Bourgogne.
They range from the chalky subsoil of the Joigny district in the north to the granites of southern Bourgogne, via the limestones and marls of the Côtes where most of the wines of this appellation are grown.

Crémant de Bourgogne Blanc et Rosé

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Vigneron - propriétaire

Characteristics :

The reds are the direct descendants of those 18th century burgundies described as “full of fire, uplifting and light, almost all genius” by the Abbé Claude Arnoux who in 1723 published the first book devoted to the wines of Bourgogne. Their colour is crimson or dark ruby, sometimes leaning towards strawberry. They boast aromas of cherry, liquorice, and sometimes violet.
They have a firm, straightforward taste, tannins pleasant once matured, and just the right amount of body.
 

Wine Steward's Tip :

Its middle-of-the-road temperament, neither too stiff with tannins nor too fleshy, means that it goes well with such meats as rabbit, lamb or duck.
It can stand salted or mildly spiced dishes (duck à l’orange, tajines…). An adaptable wine which, thanks to its attractive balance, commends itself to a wide range of dishes. Cheeses: mature Soumaintrain, Nuits d’Or, Reblochon fermier, Morbier.
Serving temperature: 14 to 16°C.

 

Situation 

At one time apparently doomed to disappear these vineyards have undergone a patient, courageous, and ultimately successful restoration. Overlooking the slopes of Gevrey-Chambertin and extending as far as the wood of Corton, the Hautes Côtes de Nuits have a wild beauty. Little villages nested in the forest fringes lay waiting to be discovered. The vineyards cover all these slopes which enjoy favourable exposures and proudly preserve their proof of nobility going back to Vergy and the abbey of Saint-Vivant. The wines will reveal their secrets to discerning palates in the company of vignerons who, like the countryside they inhabit, are full of character and profoundly attached to their native soil. The roads which take you there are winding and undulating, a delight for cyclists.
Ramblers may follow the paths among hills and valleys which lead to holiday cottages or overnight accommodation in the heart of the villages. And there, too, you will certainly find the door to the tasting cellar open.
 

Terroirs

The vineyards are located at heights of between 300 and 400 metres and occupy the sides of valleys which cut into the Jurassic limestone plateau to the west of the Côte.The underlying rock is the same as that of the Côte but the overburden is thin or non-existent. The soils are formed by a mixture of eroded limestone and marly subsoil.